CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY OXFORD UNIVERSITY LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS

UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK

  UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE

MONASH UNIVERSITY

UNIVERSITY OF BATH DURHAM UNIVERSITY
  UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL      

 

 

Cambridge University

The Tripos System

 

Degree courses (called Triposes) are not modular but are divided into blocks lasting one or two years. In some subjects there is a two-year Part I (which may be divided into Part IA and Part IB) and a one-year Part II. In others Part I lasts a year and is followed by a two-year Part II. In Engineering and some

science subjects there is a fourth year (Part II or III) leading to the degree of MEng or MSci.

 

There are examinations at the end of each Part and these must be passed in order to achieve the Cambridge degree, BA Hons.

 

One of the most distinctive characteristics of Cambridge courses is that they cover the subject very broadly in the initial years and then become more specialized and offer a wide range of options in the later years.

 

Most students take successive parts of the same Tripos. However, it is possible to change Tripos after Part I or Part IA. Most changes are between related fields: within the science areas or within the arts, but switching between broad areas is also possible, and a wide range of subject combinations is therefore available.

 

 

http://www.cam.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/tripos.html

 

 

 

Matriculation Requirements

 

These are the minimum entrance requirements for all applicants regardless of course and age, and are designed to ensure they have had a sufficiently broad general education.

 

Qualifications are required in:

 

  • English.
  • A language other than English.
  • An approved mathematical or scientific subject.
  • Two other approved subjects.

 

For applicants with GCSEs and GCE A levels, at least two of these subjects must be at GCE A level and the others at GCSE (grades A, B or C).

 

If there are good reasons why applicants expect not to be able to satisfy the matriculation requirements, for example, not taken a language other than English at GCSE, applicants should consult the Admissions Tutor of their preferred College, to find out if they would be able to waive any part of the requirement in their individual circumstances.

 

However, most applicants will be expecting to achieve high grades in three or four subjects at GCE A level or equivalent.

 

 

 

Economics Degree

 

The Economics Tripos at Cambridge focuses on giving students a sound understanding of the core of economics, pure and applied. However, while the specialized nature of this degree enables students to concentrate on studying economics in considerable depth, the breadth of the aims outlined above means that economists need to employ modes of thought and techniques drawn from many other disciplines, among them history, sociology, mathematics and statistics and philosophy.

 

Students can expect to develop skills in understanding complex arguments, the analysis of practical issues, knowledge of economic conditions, analysis of data, and effective communication. Such skills are of value in many subsequent careers, but particularly in professional, financial and managerial occupations.

 

A substantial number of economics graduates go on to professional training in chartered accountancy, actuarial work and similar fields: others are employed by financial institutions or as professional economists in industry, government and management consultancy.

 

 

Tripos transfers.

 

It is possible to combine Economics with another subject, either by spending the first year taking Part I Economics and then transferring to another subject such as Law or Social and Political Sciences, or by completing two years of Economics followed by a final-year subject such as Management Studies. Students can also study another subject such as Mathematics for one year before transferring to Part IIA Economics. Several students make such changes each year.

 

 

 Economics Course Outline

 

 

Part 1

 

Year 1

 

Part 1 provides an introduction to the subject: a common core of knowledge which can subsequently be extended. There are five compulsory papers:

 

  • Microeconomics.
  • Macroeconomics.
  • Quantitative Methods.
  • Politics (political and sociological aspects of economics).
  • British Economic History.

 

Through these papers students cover topics such as supply and demand, the role of prices and markets, employment, inflation, the operation of financial institutions and monetary policy. The Quantitative Methods paper provides an introduction to the use of mathematical and statistical techniques in economics.

 

 

Part IIA

 

Year 2

 

Part IIA consists of three compulsory papers (Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and Econometrics) plus one optional paper, chosen from Development, Sociology or Mathematics.

 

 

Part IIB

 

Year 3

 

The final year consists of two compulsory papers (Microeconomics and Macroeconomics), two optional papers and a compulsory dissertation. One of the objectives of the final year is to extend students’ knowledge of economic theory and train them to apply this theory to practical issues and public policy.

 

 

Economics Course Requirements

 

 

Given the increasingly technical nature of economic theory, it is now essential that applicants have AS level Mathematics (or equivalent). Ideally students should have A level Mathematics (or equivalent) and this is essential for applicants to some colleges.

 

Economics is seen as useful preparation by all Colleges but it is not essential and History is considered useful by Newnham.

 

 

http://www.cam.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/economics/index.html

 

 

 

Law Degree

 

The Cambridge Law Tripos gives students the opportunity both to see law in its historical and social context and to examine its general principles and techniques.

 

Although the greater part of this course, naturally, is concerned with English law, students will have the opportunity to study other legal systems, including civil (Roman) law, the law of the European Union and international law.

 

All Cambridge Colleges require applicants from the UK, EU and certain overseas countries to take the Law National Admissions Test (LNAT). The LNAT is designed to provide an assessment of the applicants' potential for the law degree. It will be used as an additional piece of information for admissions decisions alongside school results, the other information on the application form, and where applicable the applicants’ performance in interview.

 

 

Tripos transfers

 

Students who wish to combine law with another subject usually study law after that subject rather than before. It is desirable to study law for two years wherever possible, since it is not possible to pass all seven ‘foundation’ subjects at Cambridge in less than two years. If a students’ first subject has a two-year Part I, they will need to consider the implications – especially the financial implications – of four years as an undergraduate.

 

 

Law Course Outline

 

Part IA

 

Year 1

 

In the first year students take Part IA of the Law Tripos. There are four papers:

 

  • Criminal Law.
  • Constitutional Law.
  • Civil Law.
  • Law of Tort.

 

 

Part IB

 

Year 2

 

In the second year students choose five papers from a wide range of options. Most students take Contract Law and Land Law. Other options include:

 

  • Family Law.
  • International Law.
  • Administrative Law.
  • Criminal Procedure and Criminal Evidence.
  • Sentencing and the Penal System.
  • Legal History.
  • Civil Law II.

 

 

Part II

 

Year 3

 

At the end of the third year students take Part II of the Law Tripos, for which they will have selected and studied five papers from an even more extensive range.

 

  • Most students take Equity and European Union Law.
  • In the third year students can develop their interests in, for instance, Commercial Law subjects, Public Law subjects and in more theoretical aspects of Law (Jurisprudence).
  • Students can also take certain half-papers. These range from Taxation and Landlord and Tenant through Banking Law, Medical Law and Media Law, to the English Legal History 1500-1700.

 

 

Law Course Requirements

 

 

Many A level (or equivalent) subjects provide a good grounding for the study of Law at university and Colleges have an open mind about the subjects that are a sound preparation.

 

Good applicants tend to have taken subjects at A level (or equivalent) that develop a careful, analytical approach to reading and which require them to present information in a way which is well structured and thoughtfully argued. In our experience, applicants with backgrounds in Mathematics and science subjects perform as well as those whose background is in humanities subjects. Many Colleges are pleased to see applicants with a mixed background in these subjects.

 

Applicants are not required to have studied Law at GCSE of A level. Those who have done so tend not to have any special advantage once they begin studying Law at university. Academic subjects other than Law will generally provide a solid foundation for the course, as well as give a desirable breadth of experience.

 

All applicants are required to sit for the Law National Admissions Test (LNAT) test and some colleges require applicants to sit for test and interview. For details refer to Cambridge website Main Admission tests and written work page.

 

 

http://www.cam.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/law/index.html

 

 

 

 

Engineering Degree

 

The aim of this course is to provide students with all the analytical, design and computing skills that underpin modern engineering practice, while encouraging the creativity and problem-saving skills that are so important to a good engineer.

 

Graduates from this course will be equipped to be flexible across the range of engineering disciplines, will have learnt the skills necessary for effective team leadership, and be able to apply new technologies in novel situations.

 

At the end of four years students will graduate with the BA and MEng degrees. (A few students leave the course after three years, either from choice or for academic reasons, and graduate with the BA Hons degree).

 

 

Tripos Transfers

 

 

Students may transfer to the Chemical Engineering Tripos at the end of their first year, or to the Management Studies Tripos or the Manufacturing Engineering Tripos after completing Part I of the Engineering Tripos.

 

 

 

 

Engineering Course Outline

 

 

Parts IA & IB

 

An unrivalled breadth of knowledge

Years 1 and 2

 

The broad foundation of the first two years (Parts IA and IB) ensures that students develop an understanding of basic principles over a wide range of subjects, together with an appreciation of the economic, social and environmental pressures under which these ideas are likely to be applied.

 

In the first year (Part IA), students will follow lecture courses in Mechanical Engineering, Structural Mechanics and Materials, Electrical and Information Engineering and Mathematical Methods (which offers two parallel classes taught at different levels). Coursework includes: structural design, product design, exposition, computing, microprocessors, management, electronic instrumentation and drawing. Seventeen laboratory experiments are performed covering the behavior of materials, components and systems.

 

In the second year (Part IB) students study eight core subjects at a more advanced level: Mechanics, Structures, Materials, Thermofluid Mechanics, Electrical Engineering, Information Engineering, Mathematical Methods and Business Economics.

 

In the third term of the second year students select two topics from seven professional engineering activities plus a foreign language option. The topics provide an introduction to the more specialized work of the third year: they emphasize engineering design and serve to consolidate the knowledge gained earlier in the course. Coursework includes over 20 laboratory experiments, together with numerical analysis and computing exercises.

 

A highlight of the second year is the popular Integrated Design Project where students work in teams of six to design and built robot vehicles which are then tested against each other.

 

 

Parts IIA & IIB

 

Professional Specialisation

Years 3 and 4

 

Specialisation begins in earnest in the third year (Part IIA). Students choose a combination of ten modules from an extensive portfolio from which a core will be associated with one of the following areas of engineering:

 

  • Aerospace and Aerothermal Engineering.
  • Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering.
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering.
  • Electrical and Information Sciences.
  • Energy and the Environment.
  • Engineering for the Life Sciences.
  • Information and Computer Engineering.
  • Instrumentation and Control.
  • Mechanical Engineering.

 

The third term of the third year is devoted entirely to project work where students choose two activities from a variety of design and computer-based projects, projects in a foreign language or a surveying project. Some of our students are able to spend this year at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as part of the Cambridge-MIT exchange programmes.

 

In the fourth year (Part IIB), further specialization is possible and students now select eight modules from a list of nearly 100. These modules benefit from the Department’s leading role in engineering research. The courses are taught by experts, and students graduate with an advanced appreciation of theory and practice in their chosen area. A major project extends throughout the final year and this can be expected to occupy about half their time. Many projects are associated with current department research and have direct industrial input and application.

 

 

http://www.cam.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/engineering/index.html

 

 

 

 

 

History

 

History is highly focused in its objectives. It will equip students with a broad range of historical knowledge and understanding. It will teach students to evaluate critically the significance and usefulness of primary and secondary material. It aims to instill in students the confidence to undertake self-directed learning. And it emphasizes the importance of assembling, organizing and presenting ideas, clearly and coherently. Studying history will provide students with a multifaceted insight into human experience and make sense of a complex, globalizing world.

 

The course gives student opportunities to look at the past through many disciplinary lenses – including political, economic, social, cultural and intellectual – and explore how history has learnt from other disciplines like anthropology, literature and archaeology. Course options are shared with other departments, such as Social and Political Sciences, oriental studies, and Modern and Medieval Languages.

 

History is unusual among Cambridge subjects in not setting a classed first-year examination but most history undergraduates sit a Preliminary Examination towards the end of their first year. This does not count towards students’ final degree but aims to give them an informal sense of achievement to that point. The Colleges decide individually whether to enter their students for this or to assess their progress by other means.

 

 

Tripos Transfers

 

The flexibility of the History Tripos, and the fact that some Part II options are shared with faculties such as Social and Political Sciences (SPS) and Classics, means that few students wish to transfer out after Part I. Law and History of Art are favourites among those who do transfer. About ten people each year take a two-year Part II in History, usually after a one-year Part I in subjects such as SPS or Economics.

 

 

Course Outlines

 

Years 1 and 2

 

Part I lasts two years (six terms).Students choose five from 22 periods of history and study one each term for the first five terms.

 

·        Students take at least one period of British political history and one of British economic and social history.

·        For the other three papers it is possible to study any period of European history from the Greeks to the present, periods of extra-European history, the history of the USA, and/or the history of political thought. Students may specialize, for example in ancient and medieval papers, or almost entirely in the twentieth century.

 

For the sixth component, Themes and Sources, students will complete a 5,000 word essay. There is a very wide choice of topics, typically investigating a major theme in comparative history (such as gender, democracy, revolutions or music). The essay is written over a period of some months, and involves individual research.

 

 

Year 3

 

Students who have taken Part I then take a one-year Part II. (The two-year Part II is for those who have taken a one-year Part I in another subject).

 

This consists of five units:

 

·        A general paper, Historical Argument and Practice

·        Four other papers chosen from nearly 40 options in all, ranging across the centuries and continents.

 

Students can substitute a dissertation on a topic of their choice for one paper.

Course Requirements

 

There is no single combination of subjects that is especially good for students wishing to study History. It is highly desirable, but not essential, that you be taking History A level (or equivalent). Successful applicants take all sorts of subjects from Mathematics and the Sciences, to arts and social sciences. All of these teach skills that can be useful to the undergraduate historian. It may be useful to have a second essay-based subject alongside History. No subject is absolutely undesirable.

 

At many Colleges there is a preference for applicants to have, in addition to History, at least one further essay-based A level in a traditional arts or social science subject. Performance-based subjects and some of the newer A levels that contain less individual essay work for assessment would be acceptable as a third A level.

 

 

http://www.cam.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/history/index.html

 

 

Social and Political Sciences

 

The Social and Political Sciences Tripos (SPS) explores many of the questions about human beings that excite great passions and it enables students to consider them in a coherent and detached manner as the heirs to distinguished cosmopolitan traditions of thought. It encourages students to think for themselves about these questions and to understand why others will answer them differently.

 

SPS is a distinctive course within the social sciences and humanities in the range of subjects and choices it can offer students:  in few other institutions are Politics, Social and Development Psychology (in contrast to Experimental Psychology) and Sociology taught together and combined under the same roof. In the first year, SPS also includes Social Anthropology. This gives students the opportunity to study four subjects in the first year, to specialize in the second year, and to broaden out again in the third year. But students can also combine subjects in the second and third years:  both Sociology and Psychology, and Sociology and Politics.

 

SPS combines opportunity to develop specific skills and knowledge to equip students for particular careers in psychology and research, with a broad education that can lead to careers in the media, management, the Civil Service, diplomacy, national and international non-government organizations, and much else beside.

 

The course offers an unusually diverse range of career openings. Students who follow the psychology route are eligible for admission to professional courses in clinical and educational psychology through graduate membership of the British Psychological Society. In recent years, up to a third of our graduates have begun careers in finance, law and business, including consultancy. Many Cambridge students pursue further study and research, frequently abroad.

 

Tripos Transfers

 

Students can enter the SPS Tripos after taking other subjects at the end of their first or second year. Conversely, after completing Part I or Part II of the SPS Tripos, students can transfer to another Tripos, such as Law, Social Anthropology, Management Studies or History.

 

 

Course Outline

 

Year 1:  A Broad Introduction

 

Part I of the SPS Tripos introduces students to the subjects of politics, psychology, sociology and social anthropology. Studns will look at questions about gender, social inequality, the media, the state, democracy, war and peace, early social development, groups and crowds, gypsies, kinship, and religious rituals.

Year 2:  Choosing one discipline or combined disciplines

 

For Part IIA, students focus on one of Politics, Psychology or Sociology, or they take a combined course in Psychology and Sociology.

 

·        In Politics, students take one paper in the history of political thought and one in comparative and international politics. Each offers choice within it. The third requirement is for two long essays on subjects of their choice, on which they receive individual supervision and in which they can deepen their work in this year and prepare for the third year of the course.

 

·        In Psychology, students take one paper in social psychology, one in experimental psychology (which involves undertaking laboratory experiments) and another I research methods and statistics, which includes a personal research project.

 

·        In Sociology, students take three papers:  one on social theory, one on elementary research methods, which includes a personal research project; for the third they can choose between a Sociology paper on globalization, and a Politics paper on comparative and international politics.

 

·        In the Psychology and Sociology scheme, students take the papers in social psychology, research methods and statistics, and choose between the two Part IIA papers in sociology.

 

 

Year 3:  Students’ Particular Interests

 

In the third year, Part IIB, students have a wide choice. They must do either one or two papers in the subjects you chose in Part IIA, and then they can choose from a selection of papers offered in other subjects and form a range of interdisciplinary papers if they so wish. Not all the papers listed are offered in every year, but students will always be able to pursue their particular interests in a dissertation.

 

·        In Politics, students choose either three papers from a range that can include the history of political thought, modern political philosophy, the politics of the European union, the USA, Japan, and Russia, modern revolutions, international organizations, and international political economy, or two of these and a dissertation on a subject of their choice. Students also take an unseen essay paper in which they are encouraged to display their understanding of politics after three years of study.

 

·        In Psychology, students are required to take a paper in developmental psychology and to write a dissertation, and can choose from others on current research interests in social psychology or psychology and social issues. They may also take one paper in Sociology or Politics or an interdisciplinary paper.

 

·        In Sociology, students may choose from media and culture, modern Britain, education, politics and religion, and health and illness. They can also choose up to three papers from a selection of papers in Politics, or take a paper in Psychology.

 

·        In Psychology and Sociology, students can choose from the papers in Sociology and Psychology or the interdisciplinary papers. They may also take two papers from a selection in Politics.

 

·        The Interdisciplinary Papers (which can vary each year) include papers on gender, the family, social and political economy of capitalism, crime and deviance, advanced research methods, and the society and politics of Latin America and South Asia, the anthropology of colonialism and empire.

 

 

Course Requirements

 

No particular subjects at A level (or equivalent) are required for Social & Political Sciences (SPS). SPS is a broad course, therefore a range of subjects provide a good background:  from Mathematics to Social Sciences (eg. Psychology, Politics and Geography) to Arts (eg. English, History and Modern Languages).

 

 

http://www.cam.ac.uk/admissions/undergraduate/courses/sps/index.html

 

 

 

Cambridge University (Graduate Studies)

 

Entry Requirements for Graduate degree:-

 

Applicants are normally expected to hold or to be about to achieve:

 

·        At least a 2i honours degree from a UK university

·        An equivalent standard from an overseas university

·        A fluent command of the English Language

 

 

http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/univ/gsprospectus/subjects/economics/economics1d.html

 

 

Graduate Degree Summary Table:-

 

The table summarizes how each course is structured, how students are assessed, and gives other important details for each course:-

 

Degree

Duration (yrs)

Format

Assessment

MSc

2 f-t

3.3 p-t

Research leading to production of a dissertation may include some lectures and course work, but these are not part of the final assessment

Award of degree is decided solely on the results of the students’ research and on their performance in the oral exam on their dissertations

MPhil

Usually 1 year

Lectures and, in some cases, a project leading to production of a dissertation

Varies, but often a written examination and/or, in some cases, an oral examination on the dissertation

Master of Law (LLM)

1

 

Written examination and, in some cases, an oral examination on the dissertation

 

http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/univ/gsprospectus/subjects/intro1.html

Research Degrees

 

If applicants wish to undertake a research degree they should first make sure that the appropriate Faculty or Department has the necessary expertise and resources. Some Faculties ask that applicants to identify a suitable supervisor before submitting an application. Please consult the Faculty of Department website in the first instance, and contact the Faculty directly, for advice and further clarification.

 

 

Competence in English

 

If the applicants’ first language is not English then they should take a language proficiency test to show that they have the necessary command of the language to get the most out of the course. Applicants do not need to take the test before applying, but, if given an offer and applicants’ have not already sent us a copy of their results, one of the conditions of admissions will be that they pass an IELTS test level i.e.

 

 

·        Minimum requirement:  an overall band score of 7.0 with not less than 7.0 in speaking, listening and writing, and 6.5 in reading.

 

 

 

Law

 

 

Taught Course

 

Master of Law (LLM) – 1 year

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

This is a postgraduate course in advanced legal topics, not an introduction to the Common Law. It is taught through lectures and, for some courses, seminars. Independent study is a major part of the LLM:          there are no College supervisions or tutorials.

 

From the options offered by the Faculty, candidates are free to choose any four subjects, except in the cases where constraints of the timetable limit this choice. Each year certain papers are designated as papers in International Law, Commercial Law and European Law. The subjects offered by the Faculty might vary from year to year in the light of changes of Faculty policy or personnel. In recent years the courses offered have included the following:

 

 

·        Corporate Tax

·        International Commercial Tax

·        International Commercial Litigation

·        The Law of Restitution

·        International Sales

·        Commercial Insurance Law

·        Corporate Insolvency Law

·        International Banking and Financial Law

·        Corporate Finance Law

·        Corporate Governance

·        Economics of Law and Regulation

·        Intellectual Property

·        Contemporary Issues in the Law of European Integration

·        Competition Law

·        European Environmental Law and Policy

·        Civil, Social and Environmental Rights in the EU

·        EU Trade Law

·        The EU as a New Legal Order

·        Foundations of International Law

·        Law of Armed Conflict

·        Settlement of International Disputes

·        History and Theory of International Law

·        WTO and International Economic Law

·        International Criminal Law

·        International Human Rights Law

·        Law and Practice of Civil Liberties

·        Comparative Public Law

·        Comparative Law

·        Jurisprudence

·        Private Law and Political Theory

·        Philosophy of Criminal Law

·        History of English Civil and Criminal Law

·        European Legal History

·        International Intellectual Property Law

 

 

 

http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/univ/gsprospectus/subjects/law/law1d.html

 

 

 

MPhil in Economics

 

The Faculty offers an MPhil degree in two forms – Option A for candidates who do not intend to do a PhD.

 

The objects of the MPhil degree are:

 

·        To provide an advanced technical training in core economics subjects

·        To introduce students to work at the frontiers of the subjects in particular areas

·        To help students to acquire some independent research skills and experience of putting these into practice

·        To equip students with sufficient knowledge and understanding of advanced economics to proceed to a career as a professional economists in business or government, or to a research degree

 

The MPhil has three major components:   compulsory core courses, specialist papers and a dissertation. The course starts with compulsory preparatory courses in mathematics and statistics. It then includes:

 

 

For Option A students (those who do not intend to do a PhD):

 

Compulsory lectures, classes and seminars in microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics.

 

Two specialists subjects from a wide choice of options, which might include:

·        Microeconomics II (advanced core course)

·        Applied Economic Theory

·        Topics in Advanced Economic Theory

·        Macroeconomics II (advanced core course)

·        Topics in Advanced Macroeconomics

·        Econometrics II (advanced core course)

·        Advanced Econometrics (I and II)

·        Theory of Finance

·        Topics in Industrial and Financial Economics

·        Development Economics

·        The Economics of Poor Countries

·        Financial Organization and Economic Growth

·        British Industrialization

·        Philosophical Issues in Economics

·        The Methodology of Economics

·        Economics of Institutions

·        Dissertation (maximum length 10,000 words)

 

 

 

http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/univ/gsprospectus/subjects/economics/economics1d.html

 

<< Atas          

 

Oxford University

 

 

Entrance Requirements

 

All candidates applying to Oxford are considered carefully on their individual merits. Conditional offers made to successful candidates may vary depending on the college, subject and the applicant’s individual circumstances. We do not have standard offers. For A-level students, most conditional offers are likely to be set at AAA, or sometimes AAB in three subjects taken as full A-levels. In addition, colleges may specify a certain grade to be achieved in an AS-level (if it has not been achieved already).

 

The University no longer has formal matriculation requirements. These have been replaced by the following general requirement:

 

In order to be admitted to matriculation, candidates must show evidence of an appropriate educational background and good standards of literacy and numeracy. The University sets no formal Course Requirements other than for the First Examination for the Degree of BM; candidates must, however, show that they are qualified to study the particular course they wish to take at Oxford. Acceptance by a college for presentation for matriculation will be deemed to be adequate evidence of an appropriate educational background, of good standards of literacy and numeracy, and of qualifications to study the course.

 

Entrance requirements for undergraduate courses:

 

 

Course

Essential

Recommended

Helpful

 

Colleges will normally expect students to take the full A-level or equivalent in these subjects.

It is highly desirable to study these subjects to full A-level (or equivalent). If you are not, please check with individual colleges about your proposed application.

A background in these subjects at either full A-level or AS-level (or equivalent) may be useful for some elements of the course.

 

Economics and Management

 

Mathematics highly recommended

 

Engineering, Economics and Management (EEM)

Mathematics and Physics

Inclusion of Maths Mechanics Modules

Further Mathematics

Law

 

GCSE Mathematics

Arts or Science subjects or combination or both

 

http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/enreq.shtml

 

BA Economics and Management (3 years)

 

 

Economics and management are ideal partners. The fundamental philosophy underpinning the course design is to adopt a rigorously intellectual approach to both subjects with the theoretical and the applied being welded together.

 

Graduates in Economics and Management are amongst the most sought-after in the University. The breadth of the course and the range of skills which it provides have proved attractive to employers in a wide variety of industries. These employers include both leading international organizations in ‘traditional activities’ as well as new start-up companies in a variety of high-tech fields.

 

 

Course summary for Economics and Management (correct at January 2006)

 

1st year

2nd and 3rd year

Courses

Courses

 

 

Three courses are taken:

 

  • Introductory economics
  • Introduction to management
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Micro and macroeconomics
  • Six further options, including at least two management papers (a thesis may be undertaken in place of one paper)

 

 

 

 

Application Procedure

 

Candidates will be asked to submit two samples of school or college written work. Those already studying a subject related to Economics and Management, such as economics, sociology or business studies, should submit essays from these areas. Those studying more than one such subject should send essays from two different subjects Those not already studying a related subject should ensure that at least one of the two pieces is an essay.

 

There is a written test, lasting one hour, for all candidates. This is designed to test the comprehension, writing and problem-solving skills of the candidates. The format of the test may vary from year to year.

 

 

http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/ecma.shtml

 

MEng Engineering, Economics and Management (4 years).

 

EEM in a joint course, but it is primarily an engineering course, with around two-thirds in engineering. It is possible to apply for direct admission to the course, but one can leave the decision to study EEM until after the first-year examinations.

 

The flexible structure of the course allows students to choose either a broad-based degree or one with more specialist work in economics or management.  The course is recognized as being extremely demanding and many employers clearly value the course highly.

 

A major feature of the course is a 24-week management or engineering project. This may take the form of an industrial placement, which starts immediately after the end of the third year examinations. During this stage students undertake a project which is of value to the firm in which they are placed. While in the industry, they are supervised by an academic tutor and an industrial supervisor.

 

EEM graduates find employment in almost all branches of industry and commerce. They are highly prized by both management consultants and the financial institutions as well as by the manufacturing industry.

 

Course summary for Engineering, Economics and Management

(correct at January 2006)

 

1st year

2nd and 3rd year

4th year

Courses

Courses

Project

 

 

 

Four courses are taken:

Nine Courses are taken plus a design project:

 

Six months project/placement

  • Mathematical and computational methods
  • Electrical and digital systems
  • Engineering materials and thermofluids
  • Structures and mechanics
  • Mathematical methods
  • Electrical systems
  • Modelling, dynamics and control
  • Structures and materials
  • Fluid mechanics and thermodynamics
  • Safety and sustainability
  • One Engineering Science Paper
  • One Economics paper: Introductory economics
  • One Management paper: Introduction to management

 

Design project in third year

 

Courses

 

Three courses are taken:

 

·        One Engineering paper

·        Two papers are chosen from Economics and Management

 

Application Procedure

 

As EEM is primarily an engineering science course, the procedures for entry are the same as for Engineering Science, but with the possible addition of interviews in college by the economics and management tutors.

 

 

http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/eema.shtml

 

 

 

 

 

BA Law Jurisprudence

 

Course I – 3 years

Course II (Law with Law Studies in Europe) – 4 years

 

There are two Law courses at Oxford: Course I is a three-year course and Course II is a four-year course which follows the same syllabus, with the extra year being spent abroad following a prescribed course at a university within the European Union.

 

The Oxford Law degrees aim to develop their students a high level of skill in comprehension, analysis and presentation. Students are expected to read a good deal, mostly from primary sources, rather than to take other people’s word for things. They are expected to think hard about what they have read, so as to develop views not simply about what the law is, but also about why it is so, whether it should be so, how it might be different, and so on, drawing on moral, philosophical, social, historical, economic and other ideas. And they are asked to process what they have read, together with their own thoughts about it, into written form (regular essays) and into both prepared and ex tempore oral form (for tutorial and classes).

 

There is no assumption that our law graduates ought to pursue a legal career. However, both the BA in Law and the BA in Law with Law Studies in Europe give exemption from the first part of legal training in England and Wales. Around 75% of Oxford law graduates go on to the legal profession.

 

 

Course summary for Law (Jurisprudence) (correct at January 2006)

 

1st year, terms 1 and 2

1st year, term 3, 2nd and 3rd (4th) year

Courses

Courses

 

 

  • Criminal Law
  • Constitutional Law
  • Research skills programme

 

For those on Course II, who will be going to France, Germany or Italy, there are also French/German/Italian law and language classes during the first six terms. For those going to the Netherlands there are introductory Dutch language courses in the second year.

 

Course II: Year 3 is spent abroad.

 

  • Tort Law
  • Contract Law
  • Trusts
  • Land Law
  • Administrative Law
  • European Community Law
  • Jurisprudence
  • Two optional standard subjects or one optional standard subject and two optional special subjects (special subjects are half courses). More information is available on the faculty website.
  • Research Skills Programme.

 

 

 

Application Procedure

 

The selection criteria for Law, which are aimed at identifying the qualities of a successful law student, can be found on the Law Faculty’s website (www.law.ox.ac.uk)

 

Interviewers will be looking for evidence of the general qualities expected of a successful applicant to the law programme. The interview may include legally related questions as well as more general intellectual puzzles calling for logical analysis of a type similar to legal analysis. Interviewers may ask questions about the applicant’s interests and enthusiasms in order to ease the candidate into the interview, or in order to assess the candidate’s motivation. Knowledge of the law is not being assessed and is not relevant to the assessment of the interview. Sometimes, however, candidates may be given a legal extract to discuss. In this context, the only legal knowledge being sought is that which can be learnt from the extract.

 

It is compulsory for all candidates applying to study Law at Oxford in 2007 to sit the Law National Admissions Test (LNAT) before 1 November 2006. The same law test will also be used by a number of other universities. The expectation is that applicants will sit the test onscreen in a test centre near their home. It will be a test of their aptitudes rather than knowledge. Applicants’ performance in this test will be used as an additional factor in deciding whether interview is required for admission to Oxford. Test centres are now located internationally.

 

http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/law.shtml

 

 

History and Economics

 

The Joint School of History and Economics integrates economics and history to form a coherent and intellectually stimulating programme. The combination allows insights that neither subject can realize alone. However, it is possible to specialize primarily in either history or economics while still preserving the benefits of an integrated approach. The combination of economics, economic history and history (political as well as social) means that students will be equipped to view issues in the real world from a variety of contrasting perspectives. They will learn both the historian’s careful approaches to evidence and argumentation and the economist’s analytical and quantitative methods, providing an excellent preparation for a range of professional, financial and academic careers.

 

The course is designed to equip students with the basic tools of both history and economics, whilst introducing them to some of the areas which they can study later in more depth. Students will be given a wide choice of subjects.

 

Everyone studies introductory economics, which is designed to give a solid understanding of the foundations of both micro- and macro-economics. The economics course is identical to that for Philosophy, Politics and Economics and students for both courses are generally taught together. Colleges also offer teaching in intro-ductory mathematics and statistics for economists.

 

History and Economics offers good preparation for a wide variety of careers. Some of the most popular options include working in industry, management consulting, the City, law, teaching and many branches of the public service, including the civil and diplomatic services, and the Bank of England.

 

 

Course Summary for History and Economics (correct at January 2006)

 

1st year

2nd and 3rd year

Courses

Courses

 

 

Four papers are taken plus a data analysis and IT project:

 

Seven papers are taken (two core papers in Economics and one in Economic History):

 

  • Introductory economics
  • General History (primarily European):

Four options available

  • Historical methods (available options:  Approaches to History; Historiography: Tacitus to Weber;  Quantification;  Foreign texts)
  • Optional subject (involving the use of primary sources)
  • Data analysis and information technology course (involving lectures and project)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment

 

First University examinations

Four written examinations and a data analysis and IT project

  • Macroeconomics
  • Microeconomics
  • British economic history since 1870
  • A period of British history (7 options) or of general history (18 options)
  • Economic history option (English society in the 17th century or British economic and social history 1700-1870; or British society in the 20th century)
  • A special subject in History or two further subjects in History and one further subject in Economics.

 

Choices in History include:  China in war and revolution, 1890-1949; Society and government in France; Imperialism and nationalism, 1830-1980; Culture, politics and identify in Cold War Europe, 1945-68

 

Choices in Economics include: Economic theory; Money;

International economics; Economics of industry; Economics of developing countries

 

Assessment

 

Final University examinations

Seven written papers; one paper may be substituted by a thesis; an additional thesis may also be offered.

 

 

 

Application Procedure

 

All candidates will take the History Aptitude Test, normally at their own schools/colleges, on 1 November 2006. Candidates must make sure they are available to take the test at this time. There is more information about this test at

Candidates must submit, by 10 November, a marked coursework essay in economics or a similar subject and a marked essay on a historical topic A2 level, or equivalent, written in candidates’ own time as part of their normal school/college work.

 

 

http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/hiec.shtml

 

 

 

 

Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE)

 

PPE brings together some of the most important approaches to understanding the social and human world around us, developing skills useful for a whole range of future careers and activities.

 

By studying philosophy, students will develop analytical rigour and the ability to criticize and reason logically, and be able to apply these skills to questions concerning how we acquire knowledge or how we make ethical judgments.

 

The study of politics will acquaint students with the institutions that make crucial decisions which govern our lives as members of nations, states and other political groupings. They will also learn how to evaluate the choices which political systems must regularly make, and about the processes that maintain or change those systems.

 

An appreciation of economics and the general workings of the economy has become increasingly necessary to make sense of government policy-making, the conduct of businesses and the enormous changes in economic systems occurring throughout the world. Economics focuses both on individual units and on the aggregate behaviour of groups, societies and international markets.

 

PPE offers a good preparation for a wide variety of careers, many linked to subjects studied at Oxford. The careers most commonly chosen are in banking and finance, politics, journalism and broadcasting, law, industry, teaching, social work, accountancy, business management, management consultancy, advertising and the many branches of the public services, including the civil and diplomatic services and local government.

 

 Course Summary for Philosophy, Politics and Economics (correct at January 2006)

 

 

1st year

2nd and 3rd year

All three branches of PPE are studied equally.

Courses

 

 

 

·        Philosophy:

o  General Philosophy;

o  Moral Philosophy;

o  Elementary logic

 

·        Politics:

o  Introduction to politics:

§         Theory and practice of democracy;

§         Theorising the democratic state;

§         Analysis of democratic institutions in Britain, United States, France and Germany

 

·        Economics:

o  Microeconomics:

§         The functioning of the market economy;

o  Macroeconomics:

§         Dealing with national output and employment, exchange rates and policy issues;

§         Mathematical techniques used in economics;

§         Elementary statistics. Note:  there is a compulsory question on mathematical techniques in the economics written paper

 

o  Data analysis and information technology (involving lectures and project)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment

 

First University examinations

Three written papers and a data analysis and IT project

Continue with all three branches or concentrate on any two

 

·  Compulsory core subjects:*

o       Philosophy:

§               Either (1) History of philosophy from Descartes to Kant (101), or Plato’s Republic 115); or Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (116);

§            (2) Ethics**

 

o       Politics (any 2):

§               (3) Comparative   government

§               (4) British politics and   government since 1900;

§               (5) Theory of politics;

§               (6) International relations;

§               (7) Political sociology

 

o       Economics:

§               (8) Macroeconomics;

§               (9) Microeconomics

 

·  Optional subjects:

o       More than 50 choices, including:

§               Post-Kantian philosophy;

§               Later Wittgenstein;

§               Politics in sub-Saharan Africa;

§               Politics in Latin America;

§               International economics;

§               Economics in developing countries

 

* You only have to study the compulsory core    subjects of those branches which you study after your first year

** See also the

 

Assessment

 

Final University examinations

Eight written papers, one of which can be replaced by a thesis

 

 

 

 

Application Procedure

 

Students may apply for PPE having done any combination of subjects at school; it is not necessary to have studied philosophy, politics or economics. History and mathematics are useful backgrounds, but are not essential. Mathematical techniques are a compulsory part of the first year and a series of classes will be provided at a level appropriate to students’ mathematical background. Graduates of another university may skip the first year and complete the course in two years.

 

After submitting their application forms, students should send in two marked pieces of written school or college work, including at least one essay. Those already studying a subject related to PPE, such as philosophy, politics, economics, sociology, or 19/20th century history, should submit essays from that subject. If students study more than one subject, they should send in essays from two different subjects.

 

 

http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/ppec.shtml

 

 

 

Oxford University (Graduate Studies)

 

Law

 

Research degrees

 

·        MPhil

 

Taught degrees

 

·        BCL (Bachelor of Civil Law)

·        MJur (Magister Juris)

·        MSc Criminology and Criminal Justice

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

Students are selected for admission solely on the individual merits of each candidate and the application of the relevant selection criteria.

 

To these ends students submit a full CV including academic grades translated into English, a statement of why they wish to be accepted for the course, and one or two sample of their written work (depending on the course).

 

Three academic references are taken into consideration. Since the applications always exceed available places, the Law Faculty cannot admit every student who meets the basic entry requirements. In reviewing applications, qualitative admissions criteria are also employed. These criteria are listed on the Law Faculty website.

 

BCL and MJur are required to have earned a first class degree (or, where first class honours are not awarded, the equivalent) in Law as a necessary condition for entry.

 

MSc students would normally possess a first class or high upper second class (or its equivalent) degree in Law, Sociology, Economics, Psychology, History or another subject relevant to criminology.

 

 

Taught Master’s degrees

 

The Law Faculty has three graduate degrees based on taught courses:     

 

·        The Bachelor of Civil Law (MJur)

·        The Magister Juris (BCL)

·        The MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice

 

 

Bachelor of Civil Law (BCL) and Bachelor of Magister Juris (MJur)

 

 

Despite its title, the BCL, like the MJur, is a Master’s degree. Both degrees set a high standard. They offer their students the opportunity to address law in a more profound and critical way than would have been possible at undergraduate level, especially as the courses are commonly intertwined with the current research projects of Faculty members. The range of courses available is large (and includes a dissertation option), and there are very few restrictions on combinations of choice. Admitting about 150 students a year from many different countries, the programmes facilitate shared scholarly interaction between some of the future leaders in the world’s law schools and legal profession.

 

The BCL and MJur are one-year degrees:  their programmes start in late September, and run until late July.

 

 

http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/postgraduate/caz/law.shtml

 

 

 

The MSc in Criminology and Criminal Justice

 

 This course is designed to provide students with an advanced understanding of crime and criminal justice. The degree will develop in students the ability to evaluate the major theories and fundamental concepts in criminology and criminal justice; the ability to analyse critically the inferences that can be drawn from empirical and historical observations of crime and the operation of the criminal justice and penal systems; an advanced understanding of particular fields within criminology and criminal justice, relevant to their further careers or academic studies; and, by way of research methods modules, the ability to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the design of criminological research, develop research questions and designs, and, in future, conduct empirical research.

 

A single core module will run through the first two terms, combined with a number or other short optional modules (two to be chosen for the first term, two for the second term, and one for the third term), plus students will write a dissertation of 12,000 to 15,000 words during the third term. The core course normally consists of introductory lectures and weekly seminars over the first six weeks of term. In seminars students will assess the major theories of crime and the criminal justice system, exploring both historical and comparative approaches.

 

Topics covered will normally include:

 

·        Theories of crime

·        Key concepts in social research

·        Historical and contemporary penal debates

·        Justifications of punishment

·        Punishment in the community and prison

·        Crime and the media

·        Victims

·        Discretion

·        Privatization

·        Race

·        Gender

·        Organized crime

·        The politics of criminal justice

 

 

The options will take up 90 minutes of class time for the first six weeks of all three terms. The following options will normally be offered:

 

·        Methods I

·        Methods II

·        Human Rights and Criminal Justice

·        International Perspectives on the Death Penalty

·        International Perspectives in Restorative Justice

·        Public and Private Policing

·        Desistance from Crime

·        The Role of Criminal Justice Agencies

·        Sentencing

·        Risk and Criminal Justice

·        Mafias

·        Victims

·        Psychology and Psychiatry in the Criminal Justice System

·        Public Opinion, Crime and Criminal Justice

·        Crime, Political Ideologies and Political Culture

·        Policing Global Insecurities

 

 

 

http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/postgraduate/caz/law.shtml

 

 

 

Economics

 

Taught degrees

 

·        MPhil Economics

·        MSc Economics for Development (joint with Development Studies)

·        MSc in Financial Economics (joint with Saïd Business School)

 

Entry Requirements

 

Bachelor’s degree with a first or upper second-class honours or equivalent.

 

 

MPhil in Economics

 

This is a course recommended to most students coming to Oxford who do not already have a very good graduate coursework degree in economics from a very strong university. It is designed to provide training in Economics at the Postgraduate level, comparable to the first two years of the PhD programme in the best US universities. For those who do not progress to a doctorate, either at Oxford or elsewhere, the MPhil provides a solid grounding in the subject for a career as a professional economist. The Oxford faculty believes that these advantages fully justify the additional effort and costs involved in a two-year programme. The normal duration is two years, but a student may take longer in exceptional circumstances. Students normally write a thesis as part of their work for the degree; the thesis can be incorporated in a DPhil thesis, if the student goes on to the doctorate, and in this way it may be possible to obtain both degrees in around four years.

 

Although most students on the MPhil course have previous degrees in economics, there are always some whose undergraduate degree is in some other subject (mathematical subjects provide a particularly useful background). The two-year programme makes it feasible to begin economics at the graduate level and write a thesis.

 

At the beginning of the course, two weeks before the start of the Michealmas Term, there is an introductory course in mathematics. Those who have not done mathematics at university are very strongly advised to take it and others will find it useful as a fresher course.

 

At the end of the first year, there are three compulsory papers:

 

·        Macroeconomics

·        Microeconomics

·        Econometrics

 

Then in the second year, students write their thesis and prepare for two papers from a list of options. The thesis is up to 30,000 words in length, and must be submitted in the third week of the final term of the course. It can be an intelligent survey of some part of the literature, but quite often contains original research.

 

  

http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/postgraduate/caz/econ.shtml

 

 

 

MSc in Economics for Development

 

This MSc is a one year specialist degree concerned with the economics for developing countries. The scope of the course is extensive covering economic theory and application across a wide range of topics. These includes:

 

·        The Microeconomics of Household and Markets in Developing Countries

·        Human Development

·        Rural Development

·        International Macroeconomics and Globalisation

·        Industrial Policy and Trade

·        International Institutions and Adjustments

 

In addition students take courses in quantitative techniques and have the opportunity to pursue their own research interests by writing a short supervised research paper (the Extended Essay). The course aims to equip students policymaking, as well as providing the advanced training required for doctoral research in development economics.

 

The examinations consist of papers in Economic Theory, Development Economics and Quantitative Methods. In addition, candidates are required to submit an Extended Essay on a topic related to the general programme. Candidates for this course should have a good first degree in economics, with appropriate quantitative skills.

 

 

 

http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/postgraduate/caz/econ.shtml

 

 

 

MSc in Financial Economics

 

The Master’s in Financial Economics is taught jointly by members of the Economics Department ad the Saïd Business School, although teaching takes place in SBS. It is a nine-month programme that will provide graduates with an outstanding training in the tools of the financial economics sought by the financial institutions, companies and public organizations. It is also designed for students wishing to pursue doctoral degrees in finance.

 

Through courses in Asset Pricing, Microeconomics, Financial Econometrics, and Corporate Finance it will equip students with a thorough grounding in the study of financial economics. In addition to these core courses, students will be able to develop their own specialist knowledge and map out their future careers through a project report and through their choice of elective courses.

 

 

http://www.admin.ox.ac.uk/postgraduate/caz/econ.shtml

 

<< Atas          

 

 

London School of Economics

 

BSc Economics

 

Course Requirement:

 

A Level (A2) Mathematics is required. A level Economics is not essential. No other specific subjects are required at A level, but we would prefer traditional academic subjects to subjects such a Communication Studies, Accounting, Business Studies or Media Studies.

 

 

Usual Standard Offer:

 

GCE A level: grades A A A one of which must be Mathematics.

 

 

First Year

 

  • Economics B.
  • Mathematical Methods.
  • Elementary Statistical Theory.
  • One outside option.

 

 

Second Year

 

  • Microeconomic Principles I or II.
  • Macroeconomic Principles.
  • Introduction to Econometrics or Principles of Econometrics.
  • One outside option.

 

 

Third Year

 

Four options from Economics or related subjects.

 

 

http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/undergraduateProspectus2007/courses/Economics/L101.htm

 

 

 

 

 

Bachelor of Laws (LLB)

 

 

Course Requirement:

 

There are no specific course requirements for the LLB, although a standard pattern will be a range of good grades at GCSE level (if taken) followed by three A levels and accompanied by a fourth AS level, normally taken in year 12. The Cambridge Law Studies Test is not considered relevant qualification for entry.

 

 

Usual Standard Offer:

 

GCE A level grades A A A or A A B for the LLB although with some flexibility for candidates who do not conform to the standard pattern of qualifications as indicated above.

 

 

First Year

 

  • Intermediate Exam.
  • Public Law.
  • Property I.
  • Law of Obligations.
  • Introduction to the Legal System.
  • Criminal Law.

 

 

Second Year

 

  • Part I Exam:   Courses to the value of four subjects from Law options.

 

 

Third Year

 

  • Part II Exam: Jurisprudence.
  • Courses to the value of three subjects from Law options.

 

 

http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/undergraduateProspectus2007/courses/Law/M100.htm

 

 

 

BSc Management

 

 

Course Requirement:

 

No specific subjects are required at A level, though we have a strong preference for Mathematics as well as for other traditional academic subjects (including natural sciences, economics, and humanities such as English Literature and history) to subjects such as Business Studies or Accounting. AS level pass at grade A in Mathematics is required, together with the aptitude and willingness to develop further knowledge in mathematics.

 

Usual Standard Offer:

 

GCE A level: grades A A B

 

 

First Year

 

  • Economics B.
  • One Quantitative Methods course.
  • Introduction to Psychology and Behavioural Science for Management.
  • One outside option or Elements of Accounting and Finance.

 

 

Second Year

 

  • The Process of Management.
  • Economics for Management.
  • Social Science Research Methods for Management.
  • Elements of Accounting and Finance or one course chosen from the following subject groups: Accounting and Finance, Economics and Economic History, Management Science, The International Context of Management, Public Policy and Legal Context of Management, Human Aspects of Organizations and Management.

 

 

Third Year

 

  • The International Context of Management.
  • Introduction to Strategy.
  • Marketing Management: A Strategic Approach.
  • Two courses chosen from the following subject groups:  Accounting and Finance, Economics and Economic history, Management Science, The International Context of Management, Human Aspects of Organizations and Management.

 

http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/undergraduateProspectus2007/courses/Management/N203.htm

 

 

BSc International Relations

 

 

Course Requirement

 

GCSE Mathematics, grade B or above

 

 

Usual Standard Offer

 

A level: grades ABB

 

 

First Year

 

  • The Structure of International Society
  • International History since 1890

 

One from:

 

  • Reason, Knowledge and Value: An Introduction to Philosophy
  • Introduction to Political Theory
  • Key Concepts in Sociology: an Introduction to Sociological Theory

 

Plus:

 

  • One outside option

 

 

Second Year

 

  • International Political Theory
  • International Organizations
  • Foreign Policy Analysis

 

One from:

 

  • Public International Law
  • Economics A
  • The Internationalization of Economic Growth, 1870 to the Present Day
  • The Arab-Israeli Conflict: Nationalism, Territory, Religion
  • The Spanish Civil War: its Causes, Course and Consequences
  • France in International Affairs, 1940-1981: European, Colonial and East-West Conflict
  • The Great War, 1914-1918
  • The Early Colonial Empires: Europe and the World 1400-1750
  • Frontiers of Nationalism, Statehood and Independence: The History of Eastern and South-Eastern Europe 1914-1990
  • Europe’s Institutional Order

 

 

Third Year

 

Three from:

 

  • Theories and Problems of Nationalism
  • Politics of International Economic Relations
  • The Ethics of War
  • Theories and Problems of Nationalism
  • Strategic Aspects of International Relations
  • Systemic Change in the Twentieth Century: Theories of the Cold War
  • Sovereignty, Rights and Justice: Issues in International Political Theory
  • International Security
  • The English School of IR Theory
  • A 10,000 word Dissertation
  • A paper relevant to the study of International Relations approved by the candidate’s teacher from a selection list

 

 

http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/undergraduateProspectus2007/courses/International_Relations/L250.htm

 

 

BSc Social Policy with Government

 

 

Course Requirement

 

GCSE Mathematics, grade C or above

 

 

Usual Standard Offer

 

A level: grades BBB

 

 

First Year

 

  • Foundations of Social Policy
  • Introduction to Political Science
  • Introduction to Political Theory
  • One outside option

 

 

Second Year

 

  • Principles of Social Policy
  • Research Methods for Social Policy
  • One Social Policy option
  • One option from Government list

 

 

Third Year

 

  • Comparative and International Social Policy
  • One Social Policy option
  • One Government option
  • Either one option from Government list or one outside option

 

 

Options

 

This list shows the range of social policy options available in the second and third years. Some will be taught every year, some in alternate years, depending on demand.

 

  • Population, Economy and Society
  • Educational Policy and Administration
  • Family, Gender and Society
  • European Social Policy
  • Poverty, Social Exclusion and Social Change
  • Demographic Description and Analysis
  • Third World Demography
  • Criminal Justice Policy
  • Psychology of Crime and Criminal Justice
  • A Long Essay on an approved topic

 

 

http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/undergraduateProspectus2007/courses/Social_Policy/LL42.htm

 

 

BSc in Business Mathematics and Statistics

 

 

Course Requirement

 

GCSE pass at grade A or A* in Mathematics

 

 

Usual Standard Offer

 

A level: grades AAA or AAB with an A in Mathematics

First Year

 

  • Elementary Statistical Theory
  • Mathematical Methods
  • Economics
  • Elements of Accounting and Finance

 

 

Second Year

 

  • Further Mathematical Methods
  • One Statistics unit
  • Another unit in Mathematics, Statistics or Operational Research
  • A unit from a list of subjects in Economics, Information Technology, Finance, Psychology or a Language course.

 

 

Third Year

 

  • At least two units in advanced topics in Statistics, Mathematics, Operational Research and Model Building, Actuarial Science and Information Technology
  • Not more than two units in advanced topics from Management, Economics, Accountancy, Finance, Social Psychology, Demography and Law

 

 

http://www.lse.ac.uk/resources/undergraduateProspectus2007/courses/Business_Mathematics_and_Statistics/G0N0.htm

 

 

 

<< Atas          

  

University of Warwick

 

 

Bachelor of Economics, Politics and International Studies

 

 

Typical Offer (A/AS Levels)

 

Typically AAB at A level plus 1 B from an A/S level.

 

 

Duration

 

3 years

 

 

Essential Subjects

 

A minimum GCSE Mathematics at grade A is normally required.

 

 

This course is for students who wish to follow a challenging multi-disciplinary module in economic and political analysis at the national and international level. The First Year consists of a foundation year in three disciplines (Political Science, Economics and International Studies). In the Second and Third Years students may specialize in Politics and International Studies (leading to the degree of BA) whilst continuing with Economics as a minor subject, or in Economics (leading to the degree of BSc) whilst continuing with Politics and International Studies as the minor subject.

 

 

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/depta2z/economics/lld2/

 

 

 

Bachelor of  Engineering and Business Studies

 

Typical Offer (A/AS Levels)

 

BBC to BBB (See School of Engineering website for details).

 

 

Duration

 

3 years.

 

 

Essential Subjects

 

A-level subjects should normally include a Mathematics subject but the School will consider candidates who have not studied A-level mathematics but have proven mathematical ability.

 

 

The School of Engineering and the Warwick Business School jointly offer this, our only, BSc Honours degree. Students will have the advantage of studying not only with a leading Engineering department but also with one of the most prestigious Business Schools in Europe. This combination of technical knowledge and business skills is attractive to those who are seeking a career in management, business or commerce.

 

The success of the School of Engineering and Warwick Business School is based on a number of distinctive strengths. Both have strong ties with many leading local and international companies, as well as public sector bodies. Consequently, experience with real management problems continually forces staff to test the rigour, practically and relevance of their teaching. Furthermore. Warwick’s education is research led. Research is a crucial input to the complex tasks facing today’s management and the strength in research enables the staff continually to incorporate the most advanced concepts, techniques and empirical findings into their teaching.

 

 

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/depta2z/engineering/h1n1/

 

 

 

Bachelor Law and Business Studies

 

 

Typical Offer (A/AS Levels)

 

AAB at A level + C grade in 1 AS level in a different subject.

 

 

Duration

 

3 or 4 years (choice must be made at end of year one)

 

 

Essential Subjects

 

Candidates are normally required to obtain a grade A in GCSE Mathematics (or equivalent). This requirement can normally be fulfilled by an applicant offering Economics or Mathematics at A level.

 

 

This joint degree aims to give students a firm grounding in the disciplines of law and business studies and to develop a critical understanding of both the legal framework of business activity and the economic and commercial context in which law operates. Particular emphasis will be laid upon the many areas of overlapping interest between the two disciplines, for example, the structure of companies and other forms of business organization, competition law and regulation of markets, consumer law, finance and financial markets, taxation and international perspectives on law and business.

 

A Fourth Year enables students to take a wider variety of options, including a foreign language. In order to obtain part exemption from the qualifying examinations of the solicitors, barristers or accountancy professions, students will be required to complete the four year version of the degree.

 

 

 

http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/depta2z/law/mn11/

 

 

 

<< Atas          

 

 

The University of Melbourne

 

 

Bachelor of Engineering and Bachelor of  Laws (Double Degree)

 

 

Description

 

The Bachelor of Engineering and Bachelor of Laws is a (double degree) professional qualification which provides an understanding of the principles of law and skills in legal reasoning and equips graduates for admission to legal practice in Australia, combined with a professional qualification in engineering.

 

 

Structure

 

300 points of the Bachelor of Laws subjects plus 300 points of compulsory Bachelor of Engineering subjects. Final year for each course taken in a single year e.g. final year engineering in year five and final year law in year six.

 

 

Streams and subjects

 

As for the Bachelor of Engineering and the Bachelor of Laws.

 

 

Career Options

 

Engineering component:    Through the engineering component graduates also have career options within the areas of chemical engineering, civil and environmental engineering, mechanical and manufacturing engineering and electrical engineering.

 

Law component:     Law is a versatile qualification that provides an excellent foundation for many careers. Law graduates find successful careers in areas such as merchant banking, accounting, management consultancy, industrial relations, the media, editing and publishing. Many diplomats hold law degrees. Law graduates are also highly sought after as teachers in secondary schools and universities.

 

Entry Requirements

 

Required Minimum entry score for GCE ‘A’ level:  AAA (15).

Guaranteed entry score for GCE ‘A’ level:  AAA (15).

Mathematics, one of the Chemistry or Physics, and at least grade B in an accepted AS Level English subject (General Paper, General Studies, English Language and Literature, English Literature, English Language).

 

http://coursesearch.unimelb.edu.au/coursedetail.aspx?cid=724&ctype=4&typeall=1&typepg=0&typeug=0&typesc=0&stype=All&sterm=

 

 

Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Laws (Double Degree)

 

 

Description

 

The Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Laws is a (double degree) professional qualification which provides an understanding of the principles of laws and skills in legal reasoning and equips graduates for admission to legal practice in Australia, combined with an education in commerce and related disciplines, such as accounting, economics and management.

 

 

Structure

 

300 points of Bachelor of Laws subjects plus 200 points of Bachelor of Commerce subjects.

 

 

Streams and subjects

 

Commerce subjects:  Students can select from any of the following specializations: Accounting, actuarial studies, business law, e-commerce, economics and environmental studies, econometrics, business analysis and systems business systems, finance, human resource management, international commerce, international management, marketing and economics, marketing management, operations and strategic management.

 

Law subjects:   Torts and the process of law, history and philosophy of law, contracts, property, constitutional and administrative law, criminal law and procedure, equity and trusts plus a wide range of optional subjects.

 

 

Career options

 

Law is a versatile qualification that provides an excellent foundation for many careers. Students combining law with studies in economics and commerce may pursue careers in business rather than in law. Law graduates find successful careers in areas such as merchant banking, accounting, management consultancy, industrial relations, the media, editing and publishing. Many diplomats hold law degrees. Law graduates are also highly sought after as teachers in secondary schools and universities.

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

Required Minimum entry score for GCE ‘A’ level:  AAA (15).

Guaranteed entry score for GCE ‘A’ level:  AAA (15).

Mathematics and at least grade B in an accepted AS Level English subject (General Paper, General Studies, English Language and Literature, English Literature, English Language).

 

 

http://coursesearch.unimelb.edu.au/coursedetail.aspx?cid=721&ctype=4&typeall=1&typepg=0&typeug=0&typesc=0&stype=All&sterm=

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Arts (Double Degree)

 

 

Description

 

This combined degree enables students to gain professional qualifications in the area of Economics and Commerce as well as producing graduates who are capable of analytical reasoning, clear and articulate expression, innovative thinking and careful research.

 

 

Structure

 

The equivalent of forty subjects of which at least 16 are commerce and at least 18 are arts. The remaining subjects required for the degree may be undertaken from either Arts, Commerce or, in some circumstances, from another faculty.

 

 

Streams and subjects

 

Commerce subjects:  Students can select from any of the following specializations:

 

·        Accounting

·        Actuarial Studies

·        Business Law

·        E-Commerce

·        Economics and Environmental Studies

·        Econometrics

·        Business Analysis and Systems Business Systems

·        Finance

·        Human Resource Management

·        International Commerce

·        International Management

·        Marketing and Economics

·        Marketing Management

·        Operations and Strategic Management

 

Arts subjects:  contact the Faculty of Arts on (03) 8344 5235 or at arts-enquiries@unimelb.edu.au to find out the subjects available for study with combined courses.

 

 

Career Options

 

Arts/Commerce graduates seek employment in a wide range of areas. Depending on the area of specialization within commerce, graduates may choose to work in the finance industry, accounting firms, government departments, consulting firms, insurance companies, superannuation, recruitment organizations, advertising agencies or marketing firms.

 

The Bachelor of Arts component of the degree enables students to develop skills in creative problem solving and critical analysis as well as crucial skills in time management and self-motivation that can be applied to a range of dyamic career paths. Their enhanced social awareness and interpersonal skills enable arts graduates to join the work force as potential managers and leaders. The research and analytical skills required to succeed in BA are transferable across many sectors, including government, education, the arts, commerce and industry.

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

Mathematics and at least Grade C in an accepted AS Level English subject (General Paper, General Studies, English Language and Literature, English Literature, English Language).

 

Applicants with grades lower than AAB (14) must have grade B or above in Mathematics.

 

 

http://coursesearch.unimelb.edu.au/coursedetail.aspx?cid=697&ctype=4&typeall=1&typepg=0&typeug=0&typesc=0&stype=All&sterm=

 

 

Bachelor of Computer Science and Bachelor of Laws (Double Degree)

 

 

Description

 

The Bachelor of Computer Science and Bachelor of Laws is a (double degree) professional qualification which provides an understanding of the principles of law and skills in legal reasoning and equips graduates for admission to legal practice in Australia, combined with studies in the technical and theoretical topics that comprise a Computer Science degree.

 

 

 

Structure

 

300 points in the Bachelor of Laws plus compulsory computer science subjects in the first three years, compulsory and elective computer science subjects in the final two years.

 

 

Streams and Subjects

 

Regular or bioinformatics.

Major subjects: torts and the process of law, history and philosophy of law, contracts, property, constitutional and administrative law, criminal law and procedure, equity and trusts plus a wide range of optional subjects.

 

 

Career Options

 

Law is a versatile qualification that provides an excellent foundation for many careers. Law graduates find successful careers in areas such as merchant banking, accounting, management consultancy, industrial relations, the media, editing and publishing. Many diplomats hold law degrees. Law graduates are also highly sought after as teachers in secondary schools and universities.

 

Through the Computer Science component graduates can also be employed as programmers, research scientists, consultants and systems engineers. Employers include government and private organizations.

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

Mathematics and at least grade B in an accepted AS Level English subject (General Paper, General Studies, English Language and Literature, English Literature, English Language).

 

GCE A Levels:   AAA (15) including ‘B’ in Mathematics.

 

 

http://coursesearch.unimelb.edu.au/coursedetail.aspx?cid=722&ctype=4&typeall=1&typepg=0&typeug=0&typesc=0&stype=All&sterm=

 

 

<< Atas          

 

 

 

Monash University

 

 

Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Laws (Double Degree)

Total credit points required: 252 + 5 years full-time.

 

 

Course Description

 

This double-degree program allows students to complete the requirements for the individual Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Laws in a minimum of five years of study.

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

GCE ‘A’ level  -  26 points.            (AAA = 30 points)

IELTS   -  6.5.

 

 

Course Structure

 

The commerce component requires that students complete 96 points of study, including at least seven compulsory units and a major sequence in one of the following disciplines: accounting, finance, economics, business law and taxation, econometrics and business statistics, management, marketing, Asian development and transition, international commerce, competition regulation and public policy, information strategy and decision making, labour and employment, and human resource management. For details of the units required for major specializations, refer to the Bachelor of Commerce entry in the Faculty of Business and Economics section of this handbook. Students may graduate with the Bachelor of Commerce degree after three years of study, provided they have completed a minimum of 144 points of study including the 96 points of commerce units and met all the requirements for the Bachelor of Commerce degree.

 

The law component requires that students complete 156 points of study, including 16 compulsory units and a further 12 elective law units.

 

 

Course Requirements

 

 

Bachelor of Commerce degree requirements

 

Students must complete 16 units (96 points) from the Faculty of Business and Economics as follows:

 

(i)                Five compulsory common core units (30 points):

 

·        AFC1021  Accounting principles

·        ECC1000  Principles of microeconomics

·        ETC1000  Business and economic statistics

·        MGC1010  Managing people and organizations

·        MKC1200  Principles of marketing

(ii)             At least two units from the following list:

 

·        AFC1100/AFC2100  Introduction to finance, or

AFC1030  Introductory financial accounting

·        ECC1100  Principles of macroeconomics

·        ETC1010  Data modeling and computing

·        MGC1020  Organizations:  contexts and strategies

 

(iii)           A major specialization of at least eight units (48 points)in a discipline or field of study of the faculty with at least 12 points at each of second and third-year levels. To complete a major in the department of Business Law and Taxation, students must complete seven units (42 points) of study in units with a prefix of BTC or BTX offered on the Clayton campus, with at least 12 points at each of second and third-year levels, in addition to completing at least 6 points of study in an approved law unit (normally LAW2101 (Contract A) ).

 

All units taken as part of the commerce component must be taught by departments of the faculty on the Clayton campus.

 

(iv)           A maximum of eight first-year-level units (48 points).

 

(v)              A minimum of four third-year-level units (24 points) must be from those offered by the faculty on the campus delivering this program.

 

(vi)           48 points of law units identified below (*).

 

 

Bachelor of Laws Degree Requirements

 

Students must complete 28 units (156 points including the 48 points of law units counted as part of the Bachelor of Commerce degree) from the Faculty of Law as specified below.

 

 

First year – 54 points

 

·        LAW1101  Introduction to legal reasoning*

·        LAW1102  Law in Society*

·        LAW2101  Contract A*

·        LAW2102  Contract B*

·        LAW1003  Skills, ethics and research A

·        LAW2003  Skills, ethics and research B

·        24 points first-year-level core units from the Faculty of Business and Economics

 

 

Second year – 48 points

 

·        LAW3401  Property A*

·        LAW3402  Property B*

·        36 points approved by the Faculty of Business and Economics

 

 

Third year – 54 points

 

·        LAW4169  Equity*

·        LAW4171  Corporations law*

·        LAW4170  Trusts

·        36 points approved by the Faculty of Business and Economics

 

 

Fourth year – 51 points

 

·        LAW3301  Criminal law and procedure A

·        LAW3302  Criminal law B

·        LAW2201  Torts A

·        LAW2202  Torts B

·        LAW3201  Constitutional law

·        LAW4003  Skills, ethics and research D

·        18 points elective law units

 

 

Fifth year – 45 points

 

·        LAW3101  Administrative law

·        LAW5104  Civil procedure

·        LAW5159  Evidence

·        LAW5125  Lawyers, ethics and society

·        LAW3003  Skills, ethics and research C

·        18 points elective law units

 

 

 

 

http://www.monash.edu.au/study/coursefinder/course/0546

 

 

Bachelor of Commerce and Bachelor of Economics (Double Degree)

(4 years fulltime) – Total credit points required:  192 + 4 years full-time

 

 

Course Description

 

This double degree provides professional education in a range of commerce disciplines, with a strong emphasis on developing analytical skills. It allows the student increased breadth and depth in the major discipline areas, plus considerable opportunity for studies from other faculties.

 

Students are required to complete two majors – one in either economics or econometrics and business statistics and the other in one of: accounting; Asian development and transition; business law and taxation; competition, regulation and public policy; finance; international commerce; information strategy and decision making; labour and employment; human resource management; management; or marketing. Electives may also be chosen from other faculties.

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

GCE ‘A’ level  -  20 points (including maths) (AAA = 30 points).

IELTS  -  6.0

 

 

Course Structure

 

Students must complete a major specialization in one of economics or econometrics and business statistics, and a second major specialization in either the other field of study, or in accounting, Asian development and transition, business law and taxation, competition regulation and public policy, finance, international commerce, information strategy and decision making, labour and employment, and human resource management, management and marketing.

 

 

Course Requirements

 

The degree requirements are:

 

(a)              Completion of six compulsory common core units (36 points):

 

·        AFC1021/AFC1022  Accounting principles

·        BTC1110  Business law

·        ECC1000  Principles of microeconomics

·        ETC1000  Business and economic statistics

·        MGC1010  Managing people and organizations

·        MKC1200  Principles of marketing

 

(b)              Completion of four further compulsory units (24 points):

 

·        ECC1100  Principles of macroeconomics

·        ECC2000  Intermediate microeconomics

·        ECC2010  Intermediate macroeconomics

·        ETC1010  Data modeling and computing

 

(c)              Completion of at least one unit (6 points) from the following list:

 

·        AFC1030  Introduction to financial accounting

·        AFC1100/AFC2100  Introduction to finance

·        MGC1020  Organizations:  contexts and strategies

 

First-year students normally may not take a second-year unit until at least four first-year units have been completed successfully.

 

(d)              Completion of a major specialization of at least eight units (48 points) in either economics, or econometrics and business statistics with at least two units (12 points) at each of second and third-year level.

 

(e)              Completion of a major specialization of at least eight units (48 points) in a discipline or field of study of the faculty, including the discipline not selected in (b), with at least two units (12 points) at each of second and third-year level.

 

(f)               A maximum of 13 first-year-level units (78 points).

 

(g)              A minimum of eight third-year-level units (48 points), of which at least five (30 points) must be from those offered by the Faculty of Business and Economics on the campus delivering this program.

 

(h)              At least two non-compulsory units (12 points) must be taken outside the main fields of study.

 

(i)                An option to include a maximum of eight units (48 points) from disciplines taught by other faculties or from an approved list of faculty units offered on campuses other than Clayton.

 

 

 

http://www.monash.edu.au/study/coursefinder/course/1319

 

 

 

 

Bachelor of Business and Commerce

and Bachelor of Communication - (Double Degree)

Total credit points required: 192 + 4 years full-time.

 

 

Course Description

 

This double-degree program offers students the opportunity to graduate with two separate degrees – a Bachelor of Business and Commerce degree and a Bachelor of Communication degree.

 

 

Course Structure

 

Students must complete a major in one of the following disciplines taught by the faculty:

 

·        Accounting

·        E-Business

·        Economics

·        Human Resource Management

·        Management

·        Marketing

·        Marketing Communication

·        Public Relations or Tourism

 

All units taken as part of the major are limited to units taught by departments of the faculty on the campus delivering this program. For details of the units required for major specializations, refer to the Bachelor of Business and Commerce entry.

 

Other studies may be drawn from any of the disciplines taught on the Berwick campus by the Faculty of Business and Economics. These other studies can form a sub-major in one of the following areas:

 

·        Professional Accounting

·        Management

·        Tourism

·        Public Relations

·        Marketing and Marketing Communication

 

In their arts component, students complete a compulsory communication major and additional studies in arts. Arts studies offered at Berwick include behavioural studies, Indonesian, International Studies, Journalism, Psychology and Visual Culture. Alternatively, students select a sequence of arts units taught at one of the other campuses of the university. Students who opt for this alternative should note that it will involve traveling to another campus to attend lectures, and close attention will need to be paid to the lecture timetable.

Course Requirements

 

The degree requirements are:

 

(a)    Students must complete 16 units (96 points) from the Faculty of Business and Economics as follows:

 

                      (i)       Six compulsory common core units (36 points):

 

·        AFW1001 Introductory accounting A

·        BTW1200 Business law

·        ECW1101 Introductory microeconomics

·        ETW1102 Business statistics

·        MGW1010 Managing people and organizations

·        MKW1120 Marketing theory and practice

 

                   (ii)            A major of at least eight units (48 points) in a discipline from the faculty with at least two units (12 points) at each of second and third-year levels.

 

                 (iii)            A maximum of eight first-year-level units (48 points).

 

                 (iv)            A minimum of four units (24 points) at third-year level from those offered by the campus delivering this program.

 

(b)    Students must complete 16 units (96 points) from the Faculty of Arts as follows:

 

                      (i)            A major of at least eight units (48 points) in communications.

 

                   (ii)            A first-year sequence in visual culture – VSA1000 and VSA1050 (12 points).

 

                 (iii)            A minor of at least four units (24 points) in an arts discipline.

 

(c)    Students must also satisfy the following double-degree regulations:

 

                      (i)            A total of 32 units (192 points) over a maximum of 10 years.

 

                   (ii)            Overall, a maximum of 14 units (84 points) of first-year-level units.

 

                 (iii)            A minimum of six units (36 points) at each of second and third-year level.

 

Entry Requirements

 

IELTS - 6.0

GCE A Level – 16 points

 

http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/handbooks/undergrad/bus-09.html

 

 

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Economics (Double Degree)

- Total credit points required: 192 + 4 years full-time

 

 

Course Description

 

This double-degree program provides a professional education in the disciplines of economics or econometrics and business statistics, with a strong emphasis on developing analytical skills. The course enables students to include in their studies a range of social science and humanities disciplines.

 

 

Course Structure

 

Students must complete a major specialization in either economics or econometrics and business statistics. All units taken as part of the major specialization are limited to units taught by departments of the faculty on the Clayton campus. For details of the units required for a major specialization, refer to the Bachelor of Commerce entry.

 

Other studies may be drawn from any of the disciplines taught on the Clayton campus by the Faculty of Business and Economics.

 

Students must also complete a major sequence, a minor sequence, and a third first-year sequence and additional arts studies from the units offered in the Faculty of Arts degree. For information on arts majors and minors, refer to the ‘Areas of study’ section on the Arts faculty website at www.arts.monash.edu.au/current/coursework/study_areas/.

 

All units studied must be studied from the Faculty of Business and Economics at Clayton and the Faculty of Arts.

 

 

Course Requirements

 

The degree requirements are:

 

(a)        Students must complete 16 units (96 points) from the Faculty of Business and Economics

 

                      (i)            Completion of six compulsory common core units (36 points):

 

·        AFC1021/AFC1022 Accounting principles

·        BTC1110 Business law

·        ECC1000 Principles of microeconomics

·        ETC1000 Business and economics statistics

·        MGC1010 Managing people and organizations

·        MKC1200 Principles of Marketing

                   (ii)            Completion of four further compulsory units (24 points):

 

·        ECC1100 Principles of macroeconomics

·        ECC2000 Intermediate microeconomics

·        ECC2010 Intermediate macroeconomics

·        ETC1010 Data modeling and computing

 

First-year students normally may not take a second year-year unit until at least four first-year units have been completed successfully.

 

                 (iii)            Either:

 

·    Two additional second-year-level units (12 points) and three third- year-level units (18 points) drawn from the department of Economics to complete a major specialization in economics, or

·    A major specialization of at least eight units (48 points) in econometrics or business statistics with at least two second-year-level units (12 point) and three third-year-level units (18 points).

 

                 (iv)            A maximum of eight first-year-level units (48 points).

 

                 (v)            A minimum of four third-year-level units (24 points) must be from those offered by the faculty on the campus delivering this program.

 

 

(b)        Students must complete 16 units (96 points) from the Faculty of Arts as follows:

 

                   (i)            A major of normally eight units (48 points) from the Faculty of Arts.

 

                   (ii)            A minor of normally four units (24 points) from the Faculty of Arts.

 

                   (iii)           An additional arts discipline first-year sequence (12 points)

 

                   (iv)           A further two units (12 points) taken from the Faculty of Arts.

 

 

(c)        Students must also satisfy the following degree regulations:

 

                   (i)            A total of 32 units (192 points)

 

                   (ii)            Overall, a maximum of 14 points (84 points) of first-year-level units.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

IELTS – 6.0

GCE A level – 20 points

 

http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/handbooks/undergrad/arts-0170.html

 

 

 

Bachelor of Business (Banking and Finance) and Bachelor of Laws – Total credit points required: 258 + 5 years full time.

 

 

Course Description

 

This double-degree program allows students to complete the requirements for the individual Bachelor of Business (Banking and Finance) and Bachelor of Laws programs in a minimum of five years of study.

 

 

Course Structure

 

The business (banking and finance) component requires that students complete 102 points of study at the Caulfield campus including seven compulsory units in wider business studies and six compulsory units in the banking and finance sequence. Students may graduate with the Bachelor of Business (Banking and Finance) degree after three years of study, provided they have completed a minimum of 144 points of study including the 102 points of banking and finance units.

 

The law component requires that students complete 156 points of study including 16 compulsory units and a further 72 points of elective law units.

 

 

Course Requirements

 

 

First year – 51 points

 

·        LAW1101 Introduction to legal reasoning

·        LAW1102 Law in Society

·        LAW3301 Criminal law and Procedure A

·        LAW3302 Criminal law B

·        LAW1003 Skills, ethics and research A

·        AFF1110 Accounting for financial decision making

·        ETX1100 Business statistics

·        MGF1010 Managing people and organizations

·        AFF1300 Money and capital markets

 

Second year – 57 points

 

·        LAW2101 Contract A

·        LAW2102 Contract B

·        LAW2003 Skills, ethics and research B

·        ECF1100 Microeconomics

·        MKF1120 Marketing theory and practice

·        AFF2051 Financial modeling

·        AFF2631 Financial management

·        AFF2401 Commercial banking and finance

 

Two units selected from the following:

 

·        BTF2601 Banking Law

·        BTF2931/3931 Taxation law

·        ETX2121 Data analysis in business

·        MGF2351 International business

·        MGF3401 Strategic management

·        MKF2111 Buyer behaviour

·        MKF1500 Retail management principles

 

 

Third year - 48 points

 

·        LAW3401 Property law A

·        LAW3402 Property law B

·        AFF3121 Investments and portfolio management

·        AFF3651 Treasury management

·        AFF3331 International banking and finance

·        AFF3841 Lending decisions

 

Two units (not previously completed) selected from the following:

 

·        BTF2601 Banking Law

·        BTF2931/3931 Taxation law

·        ETX2121 Data analysis in business

·        MGF2351 International business

·        MGF3401 Strategic management

·        MKF2111 Buyer behaviour

·        MKF1500 Retail management principles

 

 

Fourth year – 51 points

 

·        LAW2201 Torts A

·        LAW2202 Torts B

·        LAW3201 Constitutional law

·        LAW4169 Equity

·        LAW4170 Trusts

·        LAW4171 Corporation law

·        LAW4003 Skills, ethics and research D

·        12 points of elective law units

 

 

Fifth year – 51 points

 

·        LAW3101 Administrative law

·        LAW5104 Civil procedure

·        LAW5125 Lawyers, ethics and society

·        LAW5159 Evidence

·        LAW3003 Skills, ethics and research C

·        24 points of elective law units

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

IELTS – 6.5

GCE A level – 26 points (AAA = 30 points).

 

http://www.monash.edu.au/pubs/handbooks/undergrad/law-15.html

 

 

 

<< Atas          

 

UNIVERSITY OF BATH

 

BSc (Hons) Economics – (3 years)

 

 

Built on the core of economic theory and quantitative methods, students can choose from a wide range of economics units, which allows students to focus on particular areas of economics relevant to their interest.

 

 

Career Opportunities

 

A range of careers are available to Bath economics graduates in both the private and public sectors, who are very successful in today’s competitive labour market. A proportion also pursue further study. Recent destinations of graduates include:

 

  • Accounting and Finance (34%)
  • Local Authorities (11%)
  • Postgraduate study (29%)
  • Economists (5%)
  • Retail Industries (8%)
  • Other General Careers (13%)

 

 

Course Entry Requirements

 

A level:

 

Typical offer of AAB from 3 GCE A Levels (excluding General Studies). Mathematics required, Economics or Business Studies preferred. A-Levels in languages which are intended for non-native speakers, are not normally acceptable when taken by the native speakers of that language.

 

 

Course Structure

 

 

  • Year 1

 

Core Units – common to all programmes

 

o             Introductory Macroeconomics

o             Introductory Microeconomics

o             Modern World Economy I & II

o             Computing and Data Analysis

o             Mathematics

o             Statistics

 

Compulsory Units

 

o             Mathematical Economics

 

Optional Units

 

 

  • Year 2

 

Core Units – common to all programmes

 

o             Intermediate Macroeconomics I

o             Intermediate Microeconomics II

o             Research & Presentation Skills for Economists

 

 

 

 

Compulsory Units

 

o             Introduction to Econometrics I and II

o             Intermediate Micro II

o             Intermediate Macro II

 

Optional Units

 

 

  • Optional Placement Year

 

 

  • Final Year

 

Compulsory Units

o             Advanced Macroeconomics

o             Advanced Microeconomics

 

Economics Options/Other Optional Units

 

 

 

http://www.bath.ac.uk/prospectus/undergrad/econ-dev/

 

 

 

BSc (Hons) Economics and Politics – (3 years)

 

 

Politics as an academic discipline is concerned with theory and practice in the exercise of power in societies, and the resolution of conflict about power and policy. The economics component of the degree is identical to the BSc (Hons) Economics in the first year, while the second year consists of a carefully selected group of theoretical and applied units. Greater choice is provided in the final year.

 

 

Career Opportunities

 

A range of careers are available to Bath economics graduates in both the private and public sectors, who are very successful in today’s competitive labour market. A proportion also pursue further study. Recent destinations of graduates include:

 

  • Accounting and Finance (34%)
  • Local Authorities (11%)
  • Postgraduate study (29%)
  • Economists (5%)
  • Retail Industries (8%)
  • Other General Careers (13%)

 

 

Course Entry Requirements

 

A level:

 

Typical offer of AAB from 3 GCE A Levels (excluding General Studies). Mathematics required, Economics or Business Studies preferred. A-Levels in languages which are intended for non-native speakers, are not normally acceptable when taken by the native speakers of that language.

 

 

Course Structure

 

 

  • Year 1

 

Core Units – common to all programmes

 

o             Introductory Microeconomics

o             Modern World Economy I & II

o             Computing and Data Analysis

o             Mathematics

o             Statistics

 

 

Compulsory Units

 

o             Key Concepts in Politics

o             Political Ideologies

o             International Relations & Global Politics

 

Optional Units

 

 

  • Year 2

 

Core units – common to all programmes

 

o             Intermediate Macroeconomics I

o             Intermediate Microeconomics II

o             Research & Presentation Skills for Economics

 

Compulsory Units

 

o             Economic Thought and Policy

o             Economics of Politics

o             European Political Thought

o             European Political Economy

 

Optional Units

 

 

  • Optional Placement Year

 

 

  • Final Year

 

Compulsory Units

 

o             A History of International Relations Theory

o             Global Politics

 

Economic Options/Other Optional Units

 

 

 

http://www.bath.ac.uk/prospectus/undergrad/econ-dev/

 

 

 

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DURHAM UNIVERSITY

 

 

Law – (3 years)

 

 

Course Content

 

In the first year, students will take two triple modules in:

 

a)     Public Law:                      an introduction to the constitutional law framework of the UK and EU and to human rights law

 

b)     Law of Obligations:           an introduction to the private law of torts, contract and restitution

 

In their final years, students can choose from a wide range of modules. Most students choose Criminal Law, Fundamentals of Land Law and Trusts and Equity because they (altogether with the two first year modules) constitute the requirements which they must satisfy to gain exemption from the Common Professional Examination (the CPE), the first stage of professional examinations to become a barrister or solicitor.

 

Students can apply to transfer to the four-year European Legal Studies programme at the end of their first year of the single honours law degree. If students apply to transfer they will be interviewed and be expected to demonstrate academic ability, motivation and (where necessary) linguistic ability.

 

A wide range of options will enable students to specialize in areas of Law which they will find especially interesting, or which may be of particular relevance to their future career. Writing a dissertation on a topic of their choice gives them a further opportunity to tailor their studies to their own individual interests. In both of their final years, students may also take one of a number of modules offered by other departments.

 

 

Professional Training

 

A Law degree will not by itself entitle students to practice either as a barrister or as a solicitor. However, provided that they pass the examinations in the subjects specified above, their degree will entitle them to gain complete exemption from the Common Professional Examination. If the students cover only some of the required subjects they may gain partial exemption from the CPE. After obtaining their degree (or complete the CPE) they will be required to undergo the final stages of professional training, which are supervised by the profession. A university degree confers no exemption from these final stages of professional training.

 

The Department has entered into a Guaranteed Places Agreement with the college of Law (the biggest provider of the final professional training course for solicitors) and under this agreement, Law graduates of Durham University which reach the required standard are assured a place at one of the College of Law locations.

 

If students wish to qualify as a barrister, details of the professional training can be obtained from: The Secretary, Council of Legal Education, 29 Eagle Street, London WC1R 4AJ.

 

They can obtain a copy of the departmental prospectus by writing, by email of by telephoning the Department.

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

A Level:       AAA

 

 

 

http://www.dur.ac.uk/undergraduate/prospectus/law/

 

 

 

 

BA (Hons) Economics – (3 years)

 

 

The first year programme includes elements of Economics, Economic Methods and the British Economy, plus three modules from a wide range of options. In second and third years students will have the opportunity to study specialist areas of their own choice in greater depth. Students will have the opportunity to select from a wide range of options, including: applied econometrics, corporate finance, development economics, economics of social policy, industrial organization and monetary economics. They will also write a dissertation on a subject of their choice.

 

 

Career Prospects

 

Durham has an excellent graduate employment record. Economics graduates have a high degree of success in finding employment. Recent graduates are working in:

 

  • research
  • accountancy
  • banking
  • financial management
  • consultancy
  • information management
  • industry
  • education
  • the civil service
  • local government

 

 

Subjects taught are as follows:

 

  • Business Competition
  • Corporate Finance
  • Economics of Social Policy
  • European Economics
  • Intermediate Methods for Economics and Finance
  • Applied Econometrics
  • Development Economics
  • History of Economic Thought
  • Industrial Organization
  • Labour Economics
  • International Economics
  • Mathematical Economics
  • Monetary Economics
  • Environmental Economics and Policy
  • Public Economics
  • Advanced Macroeconomics Theory
  • Advanced Microeconomics theory

 

 

Course Requirement

 

Typical Offer AAB.

 

 

http://www.dur.ac.uk/undergraduate/prospectus/econ

 

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UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL

 

 

Law – (3 years)

 

 

Introduction

 

A Law degree is both vocational (it prepares students for a legal career) and academic. While all the degree programmes meet the requirements for exemption from the Common Professional Examination and the majority of graduates go on to have legal careers, we are keen to emphasize the academic nature of the degree programme. The curriculum focuses explicitly on the development of legal and transferable skills in accordance with the Quality Assurance Agency’s benchmarking of law degrees, with emphasis on analysis, synthesis and evaluation, written and oral communication, research techniques, IT skills, problem-solving and teamwork.

 

 

Programme Structure

 

When students study Law at Bristol, they will be required to take a number of compulsory units, selected to provide an understanding of the fundamental principles of English law and the philosophies behind them. They will also choose from a range of optional units (especially in the final year of study), and have the opportunity to take optional units offered elsewhere in the University. Law optional units may include:

 

  • Criminology
  • Individual Employment Rights
  • Law and Government
  • Legal History
  • Medical Law
  • Family Law
  • Competition Law
  • Environmental issues
  • Commercial Law
  • Commercial Landlord and Tenant
  • Financial Services Law and Policy
  • United Nations Law
  • International human Rights
  • Law and the Economy
  • Contemporary Legal theory

 

 

 

 

Course Structure

 

Year 1

 

  • Law of Contract
  • Law of Tort
  • Law and State
  • Constitutional Rights
  • Criminal Law
  • Law of Property I

 

 

Year 2

 

  • Jurisprudence
  • Advanced Contract and Tort
  • Law and Policy of the European Union I
  • Crime, Justice and Society
  • Law of Property II
  • One law or non-law optional unit

 

 

Year 3

 

  • Research Project
  • Trusts
  • One law or non-law unit
  • Three law optional units

 

 

Course Requirements

 

A Level:      

 

AAA – AAB

 

IELTS:         

 

7 overall (or equivalent English language qualification)

 

Subjects required at A Level or equivalent:

 

Law is acceptable but does not give any advantage. General Studies and Critical Thinking not accepted.

 

 

 

http://www.bris.ac.uk/prospectus/undergraduate/2007/sections/SSLE/LAWD/admissions

 

Economics – (3 years)

 

Introduction

 

Economists study some of the most important things in our lives: how much people earn, their chances of unemployment and what they can buy. Understanding these issues leads to prescriptions for government policy and addresses fundamental moral concerns such as how to alleviate poverty. To do this requires a combination of skills in the humanities and strong quantitative ability, both demanded by employers: it has been estimated that an economics degree raises pay by 47% for men and 73% for women.

 

Programme Structure

 

A Single Honours degree consists of a compulsory central core (mainly in years one and two), supplemented by other subjects which students choose. In the final year, students specialize in the areas of economics they find most interesting. Assessment is mainly by three-hour closed-book examinations.

 

Single Honours – BSc Economics

 

Year 1

 

  • Microeconomics
  • Macroeconomics
  • Quantitative Methods (Mathematics and Statistics)
  • A subsidiary subject

 

Year 2

 

  • Microeconomics
  • Macroeconomics
  • Econometrics
  • Options in Economics, Finance, Management, Accounting or another Social Science

 

Entry Requirements

 

A level:        ABB – BBB/ABC

 

IELTS  :        7.0

 

Subjects required at A Level or equivalent       -        None

 

Subjects required at AS Level or equivalent     -        Mathematics

 

 

http://www.bris.ac.uk/prospectus/undergraduate/2007/sections/SSLF/ECON/admissions

 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON

 

 

BSc Economics

 

The Economics degree provides a thorough grounding in economic theory, along with the technical tools, mathematics and statistics, to assist in mastering the theory.

 

 

The Programme

 

The first-year curriculum contains compulsory courses on:

 

  • Economic theory
  • Applied economics
  • Mathematics
  • Statistics

 

Students also have the opportunity to take optional courses in or outside the department.

 

In the second year students take compulsory course units in:

 

  • Microeconomics
  • Macroeconomics
  • Econometrics
  • The fourth unit (which may consist of two half-unit courses) may be taken in or outside the department

 

Economics options available to second-year students include finance, money and banking, labour economics and environmental economics.

 

In the third year, four further course units are again taken, of which at least three must be in economics and at least two from a list of advanced economics courses not available to second-year students. Third-year courses are concerned with particular fields of application (for example industrial economics, international economics, economic development), advanced theory (game theory, economics of information) and further topics in econometrics.

 

At the end of the programme students should be competent to evaluate policy proposals logically on a sound theoretical basis and to carry out simple statistical investigations of the sort required by, say, country desks in major banks and international businesses.

 

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

GCE A Levels:

 

3 plus a pass in a fourth AS level subject or an equivalent, with the following specific requirements:

 

Grade AAA including Mathematics.

 

 

 

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/undergraduate-degrees/shs/economics/degree/economics/

 

 

 

 

Economics and Statistics

 

The Economics and Statistics degree is tailored to those with substantial mathematical ability who wish to develop their technical expertise to a very high level and attain a firm grasp of an area of application. The objective of this degree is to equip students with a thorough grounding in the theoretical principles and techniques of application in both fields. This is done through a structured sequence of compulsory courses and a range of optional courses.

 

At the end of the programme students will be adept at mathematical reasoning and should be competent to apply a wide range of statistical techniques to a broad range of economic problems.

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

3 plus a pass in a fourth AS level subject or an equivalent, with the following specific requirements:

 

Grade AAA – AAB including Mathematics at grade A.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Law

 

 

The LLB degree programme in Law (M100) is a three-year programme. No previous knowledge of law is assumed or required. The programme aims to combine theory and research with practical training suitable to university degree level. It leads to the award of the LLB Honours degree of the University of London. This degree is recognized by the two main legal professional bodies – the Bar Council (barristers) and the Law Society (Solicitors) – for the purpose of exemption from the academic stage of their professional examinations.

 

 

The Programme

 

In the first year of the programme, following an introduction to legal method, students study the subject of:

 

·        Public Law I

·        Contract

·        Property I

·        World Legal Orders.

 

All four subjects are compulsory and are examined by written papers at the end of the academic year in May. There may be an additional requirement of a course essay in one or more subjects. In the event of failure, provision exists for re-sitting the examinations in September.

 

Having successfully completed the first year of the programme, students proceed to the second year where they take four more compulsory subjects:

 

  • Public Law II
  • Tort
  • Property II
  • Jurisprudence

 

In addition, they study one further subject, chosen from a menu of options. Students wishing to take the European Legal Studies option must be able to display a sufficient level of proficiency in the relevant European language. All these subjects are examined by means of written papers in May. In some subjects there is an additional requirement of a course essay. In the event of failure, provision exists for re-sitting the examinations in September.

 

In the final year of the programme, there are more optional subjects. Students choose four additional subjects from the menu of options. In addition they are required to write a long essay on a legal subject of their choice, subject to approval by the department. The menu of options may vary from year to year, but it typically includes the following subjects:

 

  • European Union Law
  • Criminal Law
  • European Legal Studies
  • Conflict of Laws
  • Public International Law
  • History of English Law
  • Law of Evidence
  • Company Law
  • Law of Taxation
  • Employment Law
  • Family Law
  • Planning and Environmental Law
  • Media Law
  • Medicine, Ethics and the Law
  • Corporate Insolvency Law
  • Equality Law
  • Civil Liberties and Human Rights
  • Crime and Criminal Justice
  • Criminology
  • Roman Law
  • Commercial Law
  • Insurance Law
  • Competition Law

 

 

Entry Requirements

 

All applicants are required to sit the Laws National Admissions Test (LNAT). Further information can be found at www.lnat.ac.uk or www.ucl.ac.uk/laws

 

GCE A Levels:

 

AAA plus a pass in one AS level subject or an equivalent. English Language and Mathematics must be offered at a minimum of grade B at GCSE level.

 

 

 

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/undergraduate-degrees/laws/law/index.shtml

 

 

 

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